Sign Language Animals | FREE 13-page Coloring Book

Sign Language Animals

This past year, my son went through a full Assistive Technology evaluation. One of the two modalities that we are going to focus on is signing. I had gotten away from it as his health declined. But, now that he’s on the rebound, he seems to be using it more.

He is very successful with PECS at school, but now we’re working on transferring that skill to home. But, he loves animals and many of the outings we do relate to animals (visiting local farms) so I want to expand his ASL vocabulary.

SLANIMALSCWMockup

Video of Sign Language Animals

Here is a cute youtube video that shows how to do different ASL signs for various animals.

ASL Animals-Free Printable Booklet

As with everything I do with Kevin, I try to make it a whole sensory experience. Sight, sound, motor skills…the whole thing. That’s why I like this booklet.

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So, here you go–enjoy!



ASL-Animals-free-coloring-book



  • Fine Motor Skills-Games, crafts and coloring activities are a great way to use and practice a child’s fine motor skills.
  • Speech and Language– Many parents seek out a language-rich environment for their child. Any activity can be an opportunity to use and repeat new words and language, mimicking sounds, new vocalizations and articulations.
  • Executive Functioning Skills– Depending on the game or activity, it can be an opportunity to practice executive functions such as working memory, sequencing, following directions, task initiation and more.
  • Handwriting and Fluency- This piggybacks onto the language skills a child needs, but with worksheets, coloring pages and games, they can be a low-risk opportunity to practice handwriting and fluency.
  • Practicing Previously Acquired Skills-Applying already acquired skills across all environments, bring the classroom teaching into the real world.
  • Sensory-Textures, sounds, taste, vestibular, interoception, anything!
  • Social Awareness-Practice traditional social skills in a safe environment, such as: joint attention, taking turns, reciprocating conversation, waiting politely, and more.
  • Gross Motor-If you’re in a new place, practice walking across uneven surfaces, new surfaces, inclines & declines, stairs, or increasing endurance.

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