• Amending an IEP without a meeting is allowed in certain situations.
  • Schools must follow specific procedures when amending an IEP without a meeting.
  • Amending an IEP without a meeting can impact the student’s services and accommodations.

Any IEP team member will tell you–IEP meetings are a big deal. Trying to gather 5 or 10 people with various schedules is challenging. But, not every change to an IEP warrants convening the whole team.

Two women sitting at a table signing papers to amend an IEP without a meeting.

IDEA provides that IEP teams can change an IEP without a meeting.

Save The Post IEP Parent Form

Save this for later?

We can instantly send this to your inbox. Or, send to a friend.

I have found some IEP teams, the LEAs in particular, who shy away from using No Meet Amendments or No Meet Addendums. I suppose it could be considered best practice to have all the team members present to discuss every single change to the IEP no matter how large or small.

But, it’s not necessary. And in today’s hectic environment, a no meet IEP amendment can be a practical way to handle minor changes to an IEP.

Amending an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) can be a complex process that requires the collaboration of various stakeholders, including parents, teachers, and special education staff. However, there are situations when amendments to an IEP can be made without a meeting.

This article will explore the legal framework for amending an IEP and the procedures involved when a meeting is not required.

Amending an IEP Without a Meeting

This is what IDEA says about a no meet addendum or amendment.

In making changes to a child’s IEP after the annual IEP Team meeting for a school year, the parent of a child with a disability and the public agency may agree not to convene an IEP Team meeting for the purposes of making those changes, and instead may develop a written document to amend or modify the child’s current IEP.

IDEA 34 CFR 300.324(a)(4)(i)

IEPs are complex and cumbersome documents. As is the entire IEP process. But, not every change or addition to an IEP requires a full set of evaluations, endless reports and long meetings. Have you heard of the IEP No-Meet Amendment or Addendum? Here’s what parents should know about this, because it is sometimes misused.

How to amend an IEP without a meeting

Above I gave you the wording on making changes to the IEP.

IDEA specifically says that changes can be made without an IEP meeting if both the parent and the LEA agree.

What IDEA Says About These Changes to an IEP.

However, other than that wording, IDEA doesn’t call this practice a specific name.

For this reason, you may hear it called:

  • IEP No Meet Addendum
  • IEP No Meet Amendment
  • IEP No Meet Provision

States may use a specific term, but if you are communicating with your IEP team and hear any of these phrases or synonyms, know that this is probably what they are discussing.

Sections of IDEA regarding No-Meet Changes to IEP

Specifically, here is what IDEA says, in addition to the first paragraph of this blog post.

(4) Agreement.(i) In making changes to a child’s IEP after the annual IEP Team meeting for a school year, the parent of a child with a disability and the public agency may agree not to convene an IEP Team meeting for the purposes of making those changes, and instead may develop a written document to amend or modify the child’s current IEP.(ii) If changes are made to the child’s IEP in accordance with paragraph (a)(4)(i) of this section, the public agency must ensure that the child’s IEP Team is informed of those changes.

IDEA 34 CFR 300.324(a)(4)(i)
Depositphotos 172140416 XL
Yes, you can amend an IEP without a meeting.

Amendment Procedures Without a Meeting

When changes need to be made to an Individualized Education Program (IEP), it is not always necessary to hold a meeting. There are procedures in place that allow for amendments to be made without convening an IEP team meeting.

Parental Consent Requirements

Before any changes can be made to an IEP, parental consent is required. The school must provide written notice to the parents, describing the changes that are being proposed and the reasons for the changes.

The parents must then provide written consent for the changes to be implemented. If the parents do not consent, the changes cannot be made without holding an IEP team meeting.

Documenting Changes

Once parental consent has been obtained, the changes to the IEP must be documented. This documentation should include the date of the change, the specific changes that were made, and the reason for the changes. This documentation should be included in the student’s educational record.

It is important to note that while amendments can be made without a meeting, it is always recommended that the IEP team meet to discuss any significant changes to the student’s educational program. This allows all members of the team to provide input and ensure that the changes are in the best interest of the student.

Impact on Student Services

Ensuring Continuity of Services

When amending an IEP without a meeting, it is important to ensure that the student’s services are not disrupted. The IEP team should review the student’s current services and determine if any changes need to be made to accommodate the amendment. This may involve adjusting the student’s schedule or modifying the services provided.

To ensure continuity of services, the IEP team should also communicate with all relevant personnel, including teachers, therapists, and support staff. This will help ensure everyone knows the changes and can work together to support the student.

Monitoring and Reporting Progress

After amending an IEP without a meeting, it is important to monitor the student’s progress to ensure that the changes are effective. The IEP team should establish clear goals and objectives for the amended IEP and develop a plan for monitoring progress.

This may involve collecting student performance data and reviewing progress toward the established goals. The IEP team should also communicate with the student’s parents or guardians to keep them informed of the student’s progress.

In addition, the IEP team should be prepared to make further adjustments to the student’s services if necessary.

If the amended IEP fails to meet the student’s needs, the team may need to reconvene and make further changes.

Amending an IEP without a meeting can be an effective way to make necessary changes to a student’s services. By ensuring continuity of services and monitoring progress, the IEP team can work together to support the student and help them achieve their goals.

Frequently Asked Questions

What steps should be taken to amend an IEP without convening a full team meeting?

To amend an IEP without convening a full team meeting, the IEP team should first identify the specific changes that need to be made. Then, the team should determine whether the changes can be made without a full meeting. If the changes are minor and do not significantly impact the student’s program, the team can make the changes through an IEP amendment.

Is parental consent required for all changes made to an IEP through an amendment?

Yes, parental consent is required for all changes made to an IEP through an amendment. The school district must provide the parents with a written notice of the proposed changes and obtain their written consent before making any changes to the IEP.

Which parties are legally required to sign off on an IEP amendment?

The parents and at least one member of the IEP team must sign off on an IEP amendment. The school district must provide the parents with a copy of the amended IEP.

How does one properly document changes made to an IEP through an amendment?

The school district must document all changes made to an IEP through an amendment. This documentation should include a copy of the amended IEP, the parent’s written consent, and other relevant documentation.

What are the key differences between an IEP amendment and a complete IEP reconvening?

An IEP amendment is a minor change to an existing IEP, while a complete IEP reconvening is a full review and revision of the IEP. An IEP amendment can be used for minor changes, such as adding a new service or adjusting the frequency of an existing service. A complete IEP reconvening is necessary for major changes, such as a change in placement or a significant change in the student’s program.

In what situations is it appropriate to use an addendum instead of an amendment for an IEP?

An addendum may be appropriate when a minor change needs to be made to an IEP, but the parents are not available to attend a meeting to make the change through an amendment.

An addendum can be prepared by the IEP team and sent to the parents for their signature. However, an addendum should only be used in limited circumstances and not as a substitute for a full IEP reconvening.

Can the IEP team make changes to the IEP without me?

And know that IDEA also says:

(6) Amendments. Changes to the IEP may be made either by the entire IEP Team at an IEP Team meeting, or as provided in paragraph (a)(4) of this section, by amending the IEP rather than by redrafting the entire IEP. Upon request, a parent must be provided with a revised copy of the IEP with the amendments incorporated.

IDEA (bold mine)

This is a disturbing trend, and I’m seeing a rise in frequency.

The school changes the IEP and sends a notice to parents. Done.

Um, no. That is not the purpose nor the intent of the IEP addendum. The whole IEP team must be in agreement with the change.

If the parent does not understand the proposed changes, does not agree to the proposed changes, or does not respond to the request to make the changes, the changes cannot be made without an IEP team meeting.

I don’t know if schools are being malicious or if they are terribly uninformed, but lately, I have heard from several parents who have experienced this.

They were sent an IEP change in the mail or email, and when they questioned it, they were told that they could make a “no meet” change to the IEP. Yes, they can. But the whole team must agree!

Also, it is best practice to have open communication between parents and the IEP team. An IEP amendment should not be a surprise in the mail or in a backpack. A phone call or email discussion should occur first. Again, this is best practice and not required by IDEA.

When an IEP No-Meet Amendment is Appropriate.

Not every change to an IEP requires the full process. When changes are small or limited to a particular service, amending without waiting for a meeting can be a productive way to quickly make a change. The no-meet amendment should be used for small, minor things. IEP changes like:

  • Increasing or decreasing service hours for a related service, such as increasing OT from once to twice a week.
  • Clarifying an intervention or set of accommodations, such as listing that a specific set of accommodations will be given in all classes instead of just one subject area.
  • When a parent has a conference with one provider, such as an OT or subject-area teacher, they may wish to add or change one specific goal in that discipline.

Can a Parent Initiate a No-Meet Amendment?

Yes! If you would like to propose an amendment, or if you have discussed the change with the appropriate staff, send a letter to whoever you most frequently communicate with. Reiterate the conversation and the proposed change.

The IEP no-meet amendment must be in writing and attached to the existing IEP document. Most districts and states have a specific form for this. Once an agreement has been reached, the school district will produce an IEP amendment page and a PWN for you to sign.

Read it carefully to make sure the changes are what you requested. Once you sign the amendment form and PWN, you are agreeing.

The LEA/School or the parent may initiate the request to amend. In either case, no amendment to the IEP may be made without a meeting unless the parent provides written consent to the amendment.

IEP Amendment Forms: Examples

Here is the form that is available from the PA Parent Training Center. As you can see, it’s a short document. It leaves only a small amount of space to list the changes.

An amendment is not supposed to be a huge change to an IEP. For us, this would be sent with a NOREP (PWN).

Yes, it says page one of 19 at the bottom of the page. That is because an entire blank IEP is after it. For the final copy of the ‘new’ IEP with the amendment you would receive that as well.

The School Sent me a Proposed Change, but I don’t agree.

Then disagree with it on the PWN and request a meeting to further discuss it. This no-meet change option can be useful and a timesaver, but all parties must agree.

An amendment to the IEP without a meeting does not change the next annual review date.

The IEP No-Meet Addendum or Amendment is a nice process to have on hand when needed. But, as a parent, don’t feel pressured into doing it if your gut is telling you otherwise.

Listen instead of read: https://www.buzzsprout.com/255037/episodes/14005216-no-meet-addendum

Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/9Duzf6GUuWM

Free IEP Binder
Featured Image