180 Printable Lunch Box Jokes | Free | Tween | Holidays | Summer

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Lunch Box Jokes

If you asked my son, he’ll tell you that he’s too old for me to be putting things in his lunch box, like printable lunch box jokes. He’s 12. He rolls his eyes at dad jokes, which are plentiful around here.

And, he dutifully packs his own lunch every evening. It’s part of him learning to manage his arfid and grow as an eater. He can pack what he wants within certain parameters. I want him to not be hungry during the school day, but he can’t eat only Tastykakes either. So we have a list of things that are a compromise.

Still, sometimes when I’m up early in the morning, I sneak a note or lunch box joke into his lunch (as I’m double checking that there is one fruit item in the lunch!).

lunch box jokes

But you know what? You’re never too old to know that someone cares about you and is thinking about you. And that’s what lunch box jokes do.

I started doing this a few years ago. It started on a Valentine’s Day and just stuck. I had stuck a valentine and treat in his lunch box and he enjoyed it. Fast forward to 7th grade, and I stuck a simple “good luck!” note in his lunch box on the last day of basketball tryouts.

I can tell by how he mentions them sometimes that he enjoys them, even if 7th graders are too cool for school and can’t admit that they enjoy this. Sometimes he’ll even mention that a friend got a note or treat and ask “why haven’t you sent one in a while?”

So here you go. A compilation of 180 printable lunch box notes for kids.

Printable Lunch Box Jokes

I previously had these as 5 separate files, but readers said they preferred to download it as one file, and then just choose what pages to print.

I will include printing instructions after the file for those who need it.

printable-lunch-box-jokes

How to Print these Lunch Box Jokes

  1. The lunch box jokes PDF has a toolbar at the top of it, in this post.
  2. The second button from the right, at the top, is a piece of paper with an arrow on it. Click it.
  3. When you do that, the PDF should open in a new tab.
  4. At the top right, there should be both an arrow icon and a printer icon.
  5. If you click the printer icon, it will print all 30 pages.
  6. If you click the arrow icon, a popup should appear, asking you where you want to save this document.
  7. Choose your location on the cloud, your computer or some place else–indicating where you want to save this file.
  8. When you do decide what pages you wish to print, if you are not printing all the lunch box jokes, you will be prompted to pick specific pages when you print.
  9. When you print, you should get a popup that asks you if you want to print color, or b/w, and what pages or all–if you only want certain pages, indicate as much.
  10. I cannot print these and send them to you. Emails requesting this will not be answered.

If you do not have a printer, you can send them to a Kinko’s or a Staples or other print service. Or, consider sending yourself the link in email, and going to your local library to print them.

I hope these free printable lunch box notes brighten your child’s day. My husband works from home now, but I used to send them to him too! Hey, we all need a break during the day, and a reason to smile.

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  • Fine Motor Skills-Games, crafts and coloring activities are a great way to use and practice a child’s fine motor skills.
  • Speech and Language– Many parents seek out a language-rich environment for their child. Any activity can be an opportunity to use and repeat new words and language, mimicking sounds, new vocalizations and articulations.
  • Executive Functioning Skills– Depending on the game or activity, it can be an opportunity to practice executive functions such as working memory, sequencing, following directions, task initiation and more.
  • Handwriting and Fluency- This piggybacks onto the language skills a child needs, but with worksheets, coloring pages and games, they can be a low-risk opportunity to practice handwriting and fluency.
  • Practicing Previously Acquired Skills-Applying already acquired skills across all environments, bring the classroom teaching into the real world.
  • Sensory-Textures, sounds, taste, vestibular, interoception, anything!
  • Social Awareness-Practice traditional social skills in a safe environment, such as: joint attention, taking turns, reciprocating conversation, waiting politely, and more.
  • Gross Motor-If you’re in a new place, practice walking across uneven surfaces, new surfaces, inclines & declines, stairs, or increasing endurance.

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