15 Easter Basket and Gift Ideas for Older Kids

Easter Gifts for Older Kids

You know, this time of year, it’s lovely to think back to Easter egg hunts and sitting on the Easter Bunny’s lap for photos. (does any kid really like that?)

But, there comes an age when any mention of those activities gets you an eye roll. Followed by a “Mo-om, I’m too old for that.” Sigh, they are. But, just because our kids are older doesn’t mean we stop celebrating Easter. It just looks different.

easter gifts

I’m not thrilled with my kids eating a ton of candy, but we do still indulge around holidays.

As always, the Facebook group proved to be an awesome resource and crowdsourcing ideas.

easter gift older kids

Here is what they came up with, as far as what Easter basket ideas their older kids enjoyed. Mind you, I don’t care if something is age-appropriate or not.

I let my kids enjoy things, no matter what age those things are ‘supposed’ to be for.

Here is the crowdsourced list of Easter gift ideas for older kids.

Easter Basket Ideas for Older Kids

  1. Gift Cards: Gift cards are always a great idea. They don’t have to be a high value. Apple Music, Google Play Store, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Ulta….never a shortage of ideas!
  2. Coloring Books: You can find coloring books for all age levels and abilities. And for an older child or teenager, you can find nice markers, colored pencils or pastels.
  3. Cash: Stop at the bank and get some clean bills or a roll of clean coins. My boys love receiving coins in their eggs from my dad. It’s a tradition. And, the holiday fun is over, we work on learning how to manage money.
  4. Coupon Book: You know how kids often make coupon books to give to us for holidays? How about doing it in reverse? My 10-year-old loves getting Homework Passes from his teacher. I think he’d equally enjoy a Chore Pass or something like that. You can also make it for some 1:1 time with one child or an experience like a park or other outing.
  5. Sports/Activities: If your child plays a sport or has a hobby, there is likely some piece of equipment or novelty item you can find related to that activity. It could be a fishing lure, a new baseball glove or a piano book. Surely you can find something!
  6. Tickets to an Event: Large or small–a movie, or an NBA game, whatever their favorite thing is.
  7. Accessories: Fancy socks or a hat that they’ve had their eye on will likely be a big hit! And this idea is appropriate for both boys and girls.
  8. Nail Polish: Use fun spring colors and creative arranging skills to make this gift look spectacular. Use this same idea with other small, colorful items–socks, hair accessories or whatever your child is into.
  9. Ask: If you want it to be a surprise, you don’t have to ask. Maybe just listening will give you some clues. But what is an item that your child has mentioned recently that they are interested in?
  10. Gas Card: For the teen who is driving, why not a gas card?
  11. Lego: Many Lego sets are for ages 18+ now. If your child is still interested, indulge!
  12. Water Bottle and Stickers: Certain water bottles and stickers are a huge fad right now. Ask your child about it.
  13. Jibbitz: Jibbitz are those things that you stick in Crocs. I don’t know about girls, but I know the teen and tween boys around here are really into Crocs with lots of jibbitz. And those damn things are expensive! Like $5 each sometimes. I found cheaper ones and a better assortment on Etsy. Still ended up spending more on those than I did the actual Crocs, but anyway…
  14. Books: Have a voracious reader? Why not fill their Easter basket with books?
  15. Phone Accessories: This age group sure does love their phones! Get them a new pop socket, cover, paid apps, fun wireless charger, ear buds…lots of possibilities.
colorful arrangement of nail polish

Easter Egg Hunts for Older Kids

Since originally publishing this post, I’ve had several reach out and ask about egg hunt ideas for older kids.

First, if a child wants to participate in an Easter Egg Hunt, I would hope that age would not prohibit them.

It is becoming more common to have an accessible section or age group to complement community egg hunts. The idea being that a disabled child cannot run as fast or may not have the motor planning to collect eggs quickly.

Ask the organization who is hosting the event if this is possible.

Then, you can still use any of the ideas above. No! I’m not suggesting you trying to cram a pair of funky socks in a plastic Easter egg. Use tokens or tickets in the eggs to trade in for prizes.

My dad’s VFW does that and it works well. Just make sure you have enough volunteers to assist with the ticket exchange.

Good luck and Happy Easter!

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