Free Activities to Teach Symmetry | Winter Theme

Symmetry Activities

When snow and ice come around, many schools move to an online format. It can be hard to keep kids engaged when all they want to do is go out in the snow! One way to overcome this is to use winter and snow themed activities to teach the skill you’re trying to teach.

Because many IEP students are wired differently, they struggle to learn the concept of symmetry. And, if you don’t understand symmetry, you cannot understand asymmetry. No, not trying to sound like Sheldon Cooper.

winter symmetry activities

What is symmetry?

Symmetry is a math skill or math concept. When looking at a symmetrical picture, all the shapes on one side of the picture are exactly the same on the other side.

For the most part, human faces are symmetrical. If you draw a vertical line down the middle of a face, the sides are equal.

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Symmetry is found everywhere in nature and is also one of the most prevalent themes in art, architecture, and design in cultures all over the world and throughout human history.Β 

A heart is symmetrical. I mean a heart drawing. Our heart, the organ, is not perfectly symmetrical, though it’s pretty close.

heart made out of snow
Ok, this one isn’t perfectly symmetrical. But you get the idea. (and it went well with the winter theme.

The American Flag is asymmetrical, if you are looking for an example of that.

Why is symmetry important?

Understanding symmetry is a math skill, but it also helps with executive functioning skills.

Symmetry isΒ a fundamental part of geometry, nature, and shapes. It creates patterns that help us organize our world conceptually. People use concepts of symmetry every day and may not even realize it.

Symmetry also plays a role in matching and sequencing skills.

Many studies have been done on the human brain, symmetry and working memory. Most humans prefer a symmetrical image to an asymmetrical image. Recall and working memory is found to be better when recalling a symmetrical image instead of an asymmetrical one.

Symmetry Activities: Winter Theme

So, with all that being said, here are the winter themed symmetry worksheets. They are free and printable.

Many students learn easier and faster when using a multisensory approach.

To make the activity multisensory, you may have to add some materials. Here are some suggestions.

  • Toothpicks to duplicate the drawing and make it symmetrical on a table or desk
  • Crayons or colored pencils to make the drawing both symmetrical by design and perhaps asymmetrical with coloring
  • Sand bin, bean bin, rice or snow-Have student replicate the drawing by finger drawing in the material.
  • Stand up and make your body symmetrical and asymmetrical by moving your limbs.

Here you go, enjoy!

printable-symmetry-activities


  • Fine Motor Skills-Games, crafts and coloring activities are a great way to use and practice a child’s fine motor skills.
  • Speech and Language– Many parents seek out a language-rich environment for their child. Any activity can be an opportunity to use and repeat new words and language, mimicking sounds, new vocalizations and articulations.
  • Executive Functioning Skills– Depending on the game or activity, it can be an opportunity to practice executive functions such as working memory, sequencing, following directions, task initiation and more.
  • Handwriting and Fluency- This piggybacks onto the language skills a child needs, but with worksheets, coloring pages and games, they can be a low-risk opportunity to practice handwriting and fluency.
  • Practicing Previously Acquired Skills-Applying already acquired skills across all environments, bring the classroom teaching into the real world.
  • Sensory-Textures, sounds, taste, vestibular, interoception, anything!
  • Social Awareness-Practice traditional social skills in a safe environment, such as: joint attention, taking turns, reciprocating conversation, waiting politely, and more.
  • Gross Motor-If you’re in a new place, practice walking across uneven surfaces, new surfaces, inclines & declines, stairs, or increasing endurance.

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